Index Cards – Shadows of Former Glory

I ran out of index cards last week.

Since the new year, I’ve been using them to keep notes. I thought I had plenty, since I had just bought 300 of them from Office Depot, and it said “index cards” on the package. Upon opening them, however, they felt like nothing more than cut up scraps of paper.

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Evolutionary Blind Spots – Played by an Out-of-Tune Banjo

Robert Greene’s book Mastery is…um…masterful. Packed to the brim with anecdotes and insightful information. I thoroughly enjoyed it. But the author’s faith in evolutionary dogma has created curious blind spots that made me almost laugh out loud while reading them.

These blind spots aren’t unique to him, but when you’re in the middle of reading something that rings true at such a perfect pitch that it vibrates your very soul, you tend to stumble a bit when the song switches to being played by an out-of-tune banjo.

He starts off one passage by trying to come up with a definition of reality (emphasis mine):

…let us start our definition with a simple, undeniable fact: some 4 billion years ago, life began on this planet in the shape of simple cells.

You got that? It’s undeniable. That’s quite an impressive faith that Greene has, considering how hard it is to come to a consensus on certain things that happened just 2000 years ago.

He continues a few paragraphs later (again, emphasis mine):

Some archeologists have speculated about a single female ancestor from whom all modern humans have descended.

I’m sure he wrote this with a straight face, and his editor read it nodding his/her head as if it made total sense. This is apparently an opinion that smart, respectful people hold. However, give this ancestor a name (like, I don’t know…Eve, for instance) and suddenly you’re a raving fundamentalist. And not the adorable kind that they still invite to parties.

People holding to evolutionary dogma also can’t stop speaking about purpose and design. They can’t help trying to figure out purpose from supposed randomness.

At another point in the book, he recounts a robotics engineer’s experience while studying the human hand, and how the engineer was perplexed about a certain bump that allows us to grasp objects with more power. How odd that this bump would evolve just for this purpose.

Very odd, indeed.

Another example of this comes from the Eric Weinstein section of Tools of Titans. He talks about a virus that looks like a lunar lander.

It’s a little crazy to think that before Plato ever existed, nature had figured out this complicated 20-sided object. But because it was natural at a mathematical level…nature found the canonical design even though there was no canonical designer…Because it was a God-given form…

He continues:

Or the recent discovery of grasshoppers that use gear mechanisms for jumping. You would think we had invented gears. But, in fact, gears are such a natural idea that natural selection found it long before we did…These forms really don’t have an inventor so much as a discoverer.

Weinstein has to personify nature and natural selection, and even uses the term “God-given form.”

They can’t not reference design as a concept when talking about the natural world. Modern scientists are stuck in the unenviable position of trying to reverse-engineer nature while at the same time pretending nothing was actually engineered.

What does it even mean to live in a universe where everything works together so perfectly that there are “things that are natural at a mathematical level?” That we can extrapolate concepts purely in our mind, and know they will work and make sense in reality? That is a staggering consequence of order. Not randomness.

Stoicism and Ingratitude – Legend All the Way Down

The popularity of Stoicism is on the rise, and it’s not hard to see why. It offers some sense of direction and purpose to a generation that is lost and has been taught from birth that everything is meaningless. It speaks some hard truths people are desperate to hear. It calls for responsibility and discipline and is above all a very practical philosophy, with maxims to practice and do.

It also has the advantage of having a large body of literature that is accessible and readable, and the Stoics should probably we required reading for all people of the West.

A pagan could do much worse than Stoicism. Though ultimately, it can lead to despair. Just read up on the lives of some popular Stoics and how their lives ended. Or how they wrote about suicide.

One of the other dangers, I think, is a cultivation of ingratitude. This isn’t unique to Stoicism, but it can fester in unique ways.

Take this quote from Marcus Aurelius:

“Like seeing roasted meat and other dishes in front of you and suddenly realizing: This is a dead fish. A dead bird. A dead pig. Or that this noble vintage is grape juice, and the purple robes are sheep wool dyed with shellfish blood. Or making love – something rubbing against your penis, a brief seizure and a little cloudy liquid. Perceptions like that – latching onto things and piercing through them, so we see what they really are. That’s what we need to do all the time – all through our lives when things lay claim to our trust – to lay them bare and see how pointless they are, to strip away the legend that encrusts them.”

If this is the lens you start to see everything through, your life will start to seem rather drab and dreary. True, it will help inoculate you if you ever lose access to the finer things…but to what end? What if the vaccine is worse than the disease?

Better the Christian way. In everything, give thanks. Everything is sanctified through thanksgiving (1 Tim. 4:4-5). All things are a gift from God. The Lord gives and the Lord takes away, and either way, blessed be the name of the Lord. It was never ours to begin with. We were just stewards for a time.

Enjoy them, but let them point you to the One who is eternal and never-changing.

“Oh, taste and see that the LORD is good!” – Psalm 34:8

“Go, eat your bread with joy, and drink your wine with a merry heart, for God has already approved what you do.” – Ecclesiastes 9:7

“On this mountain the LORD of hosts will make for all peoples a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wine, of rich food full of marrow, of aged wine well refined.”  – Isaiah 25:6

May your fountain be blessed,
    and may you rejoice in the wife of your youth.
     A loving doe, a graceful deer—
    may her breasts satisfy you always,
    may you ever be intoxicated with her love.” – Proverbs 5:18-19

This is how the Bible talks about these things. Revel in the legend that encrusts them, because the creator of the legend was God himself, and it turns out that when you get through the crust, it’s still legend all the way down.

Stoicism wants us to see things as they really are. But that’s only possible through unrelenting gratitude and the eyes of faith.

Children of Voldemort

Those who harp on privilege, steeped in postmodern thought, are the children of Voldemort. “There is no good and evil, there is only power…and those too weak to seek it.”

Ironically, they try to gain this power by claiming victimhood and oppression. By claiming to be weak. This is a stark parody of Jesus, who did indeed gain power and authority by humbly submitting to being a victim.

And He is the only true victim.